Free or paid, we highly recommend that you back up at least your essential data   against theft, malware or ransomware, and natural disasters, not to mention user error. Even if you work online, a local backup is a lot quicker to restore. And this goes beyond PCs: We get a lot of emails asking how to get data back from a stolen phone—the users generally don’t like the answer. 

Backup software: We run each program through the various types of backups it’s capable of. This is largely to test reliability and hardware compatibility, but we time two: an approximately 115GB system image (two partitions), and a roughly 50GB image created from a set of smaller files and folders. We then mount the images and test their integrity via the program’s restore functions. We also test the USB boot drives created by the programs.
CrashPlan is completely free if you're just doing local backups, but even online backups are affordable, with CrashPlan+ accounts starting at $2/mo (per computer) for 10GB of online backup storage, and going up to $4/mo (per computer) for unlimited online backup storage and $9/mo for unlimited online backup storage for a whole household. You can check out their plans here, and try them free for 30 days with a new account.

If you’re looking to download a whole YouTube channel at one time, this is definitely one way that you can do it. WinX YouTube Downloader can download over 1000 URLs. Even more, it has support for different YouTube playlists and channels and even gives you the ability to record your own live videos, so this is one platform that can definitely achieve a whole lot more than you might have thought. On top of that, it doesn’t give you any kind of ads (because who wants to watch those?) and it lets you download from just about any kind of platform and into just about any kind of file.
The DVDVideoSoft system gives you free downloads in just about any style you might need. It’s an easier YouTube video downloader that consists of only three different steps. The system is older than some because it’s more than ten years old and it provides some of the best quality you could want. It’s available to be used on both PC and Mac computers, which gives you the level of versatility and flexibility that you’re looking for before you even get started. Plus, you can get a range of different options or different formatting features to the videos that you want to download.
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Here at BestBackups, we put together all of our Top Backups lists with the aim of introducing our readers to the best online storage and backup solutions available. However, due to the varying needs of consumers with video files, the best services to backup videos roundup was made taking a slightly different approach to our standard 1-5 ranking. Instead, we focused on a few key features that we believed ticked all the most important boxes and drew attention to the services that do them best.

You actually get the option to save your downloaded YouTube videos in different formats, which means they can be accessible in different ways and from different devices. There’s even the option to download to an MP3 file with most of these, which means that you can skip the video and be able to listen to the audio through your MP3 player or your phone. Each of these makes it easy for you to get the information without having to go through an internet connection in order to do it and easy to know how to download YouTube channel.
Free or paid, we highly recommend that you back up at least your essential data   against theft, malware or ransomware, and natural disasters, not to mention user error. Even if you work online, a local backup is a lot quicker to restore. And this goes beyond PCs: We get a lot of emails asking how to get data back from a stolen phone—the users generally don’t like the answer. 
The final option is a free YouTube channel downloader that can download from a range of different websites that include Twitter, Facebook, Vimeo, and Instagram, among others. Plus, TubeGet gives you options on the specific resolution that you want to use for the videos and even offers different video formats. All of these things mean that the video you end up with is going to be exactly what you’re looking for, without you having to settle for anything else along the way. It even gives you the option to download those videos as an MP3 so you can listen only to the audio if you prefer.

BackBlaze doesn't have an offline component, so you'll have to handle that yourself, but it's by far one of the most affordable options on the market. Accounts are $5/mo (you get a break if you pay up front for one or two years), and you can add more computers to the same account for another $5/mo. You can read more about Backblaze's pricing options here.

Carbonite is one of the web's most popular online backup services, and for good reason. The Carbonite client runs quietly in the background uploading your data to Carbonite's servers to make sure it's safe in case something happens to your computer. Carbonite can automatically back up documents, music, email, and other files (although it manually backs up video), and grants you access to those files and your archives on your smartphone. Carbonite supports Windows and OS X (although its Home Plus and Home Premier plans only support Windows), and make restoring your files as easy as backing them up. Your offsite files are encrypted to keep them safe from prying eyes, and all of their plans include unlimited storage for your backed up files. Carbonite's Home Plus plan extends its features and allows you to back up external hard drives and not just files on your computer, and allows you to back up full system images. The Home Premier plan includes both of those features and adds automatic backup of your video files, and a courier recovery service that delivers you backups on a hard drive to you ASAP if something terrible happens.
Android and YouTube has a relationship that needs no introduction at all. It is all due to the fact that both are owned and operated by Google Inc. The users on the other hand are also fond of both the services due to their presence, internet traffic routing as well as the huge content that is uploaded. Following are the 10 best YouTube offline Apps for Android used for the content management.
Jihosoft 4K Video Downloader is available as a completely free system that actually works for both PC and Mac users, but there’s a paid version as well. What’s really great about this YouTube video downloader is that it actually works for just about any kind of video you want to download, whether that video comes from Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, SoundCloud, or YouTube, so you’re not stuck with just one platform. You’re also going to have the option to download in just about any resolution and still get all the audio and subtitles that usually come with the video. On top of all that, you can convert to any video format or even MP3 audio, so you’re always able to watch (or listen).
Many users don’t welcome the new rules. For one, it means that they aren’t able to. It’s one reason that many users are looking to download their YouTube videos to their hard drive now before YouTube actually decides to block accounts. Many YouTubers are also looking to make their videos private, since any hint of blood and gore could have their videos taken down – and they don’t want that.
Step 3: Choose your targeted video format from the top right corner. There are a lot of formats available. Including MP4, AVI, MKV, and MOV. After this, click on the conversion icon on the right of the chosen file. If you have to convert all the videos in the chosen list, simply choose the “Convert All” option on the bottom right of the main window.
CrashPlan is our favorite backup tool for Windows, for the Mac, and we've even shown you how to build a bulletproof backup solution with it. CrashPlan gives you the flexibility to back up any folders you select on your computer (or whole drives, if you prefer) to external hard drives, other computers on the same network, a friend's computer across the internet, or online to CrashPlan's own servers, where it's stored and encrypted to keep your data safe. The backup utility is set-it-and-forget-it, and it runs quietly in the background whenever you're away from your computer, or at specified times of day. It's smart enough to only do differentials and incrementals, and supports multiple backup destinations so you can back everything up at one time everywhere it needs to go. Restores are just as easy, and a few clicks drops all of your files right back where they should be. You even get access to your backup data on your mobile devices. If you have a ton of data to back up or restore, you can even have CrashPlan send an external hard drive to your house that you can back up to and use to seed your first backups or restore from, all without blowing past your ISP's bandwidth limitations. You can read more about CrashPlan's features here.
Bitcasa Infinite Drive is relatively new, but it's one of your favorite cloud storage providers in general, mostly because they offer virtually unlimited stroage for syncing and backups. When we say unlimited, we mean it—some of you are using terabytes of storage with Bitcasa. It's not primarily a backup service though, and while it was built for file syncing and storage, the Bitcasa desktop client does support regular file backups. Bitcasa supports Windows and OS X, and encrypts all of your files before uploading so they stay safe from prying eyes. Bitcasa even keeps revision history, so if you've backed up a file multiple times and need an older version, you can pick it out and restore it. Plus, you can use the Bitcasa mobile apps for iOS, Android, and Windows Phone to access your data on the go.
Michael Muchmore is PC Magazine's lead analyst for software and web applications. A native New Yorker, he has at various times headed up PC Magazine's coverage of Web development, enterprise software, and display technologies. Michael cowrote one of the first overviews of web services for a general audience. Before that he worked on PC Magazine's Solutions section, which covered programming techniques as well as tips on using popular office software. He previously covered services and software for ExtremeTech.com.
SpiderOak's beauty is that it's a combination cloud syncing and storage service as well as a backup client all in one. Unlike some of the other services though, you'll have to pay for the storage you use. You get 2GB for free just for signing up, and you can get up to 10GB by referring friends. SpiderOak Plus nets you 100GB for $10/mo to use for syncing and backups, and every 100GB after that is another $10/mo. Plus, you can connect as many computers to any SpiderOak account as you want, so you're not paying by the system. You can read more about SpiderOak's plans here.
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