Totally free, 5KPlayer from DearMob is a media-playing utility that is a lot more than a downloader—but it's got a heck of a downloader integrated. Promising no viruses, ads, or plug-in requirements is a good start. It is, sadly, one of the few I tested that asks for a registration of your name and email—you have to do that to get the full download function across 300+ sites. You may still use it if you don't register; I didn't and was able to download 4K vids from YouTube.
No honorable mentions this week, as the nominations dropped off pretty sharply from these five. Some of you pointed to your own kind of franken-backup solution that made use of traditional cloud storage services like Dropbox and Google Drive in addition with desktop utilities and clients that can automatically copy whatever you want from your computer to specified files and folders in those services, which is a great option if you want the absolute ultimate in control.
No honorable mentions this week, as the nominations dropped off pretty sharply from these five. Some of you pointed to your own kind of franken-backup solution that made use of traditional cloud storage services like Dropbox and Google Drive in addition with desktop utilities and clients that can automatically copy whatever you want from your computer to specified files and folders in those services, which is a great option if you want the absolute ultimate in control.
VidPaw offers up the usual features but on a relatively spartan interface. Though it shows how YouTube might someday crack down on these things—VidPaw's own tutorial video, hosted on YouTube, was "no longer available because the YouTube account associated with this video has been terminated." For now, however, the site works with 1,000+ other sites. It doesn't offer video/audio combo downloads larger than 720p MP4s; you can get the video alone as a 2160p WebM format if you desire.
There are a few common practices for configuring when backups occur. The most common option is on a fixed schedule, such as once a day, week, or month. The second, which we prefer, is to upload file changes whenever they're changed and saved, otherwise known as a continuous backup setting. Services only transfer the modified part of the file in this scenario, so as not to overburden your internet connection or take up unnecessary storage. A third way is simply to upload files manually. Some may appreciate this degree of control, but this method is only effective if you remember to regularly run the backup.
5K Player also features DLNA server playback so videos you grab can be watched on any devices on your home supporting DLNA network; it supports AirPlay for quick playback to supported devices. Pick a video in the library and you can do a quick conversion to MP4, MP3, or even ACC (an audio format preferred by iOS devices). The player didn't like playing back the overly large 4K file though and experienced buffering issues—VLC didn't have any problem with the same file. Ultimately, there's a lot to like about 5K Player, from the price to the features, especially if you look at them as extras on a downloader. But the interface and playback issues may have you looking elsewhere.
Remember that problem of using Chrome extensions from the Google Web Store? You're going to have an even bigger issue when you want to download from YouTube using an Android app from the Google Play store, where Google has an even tighter grip. (Nor can you actually download anything with your officially sanctioned YouTube apps. Unless you live in India.)

Remember that problem of using Chrome extensions from the Google Web Store? You're going to have an even bigger issue when you want to download from YouTube using an Android app from the Google Play store, where Google has an even tighter grip. (Nor can you actually download anything with your officially sanctioned YouTube apps. Unless you live in India.)


That said, with Android it is possible to install apps without going through Google. The latest is InsTube – Free Video and Music Downloader just for Android—you can only get it at InsTube's site. You download the APK (Android application package) file to sideload on an Android device. Find it in your device's downloads and click it to install. (You may have to go into your security settings and enable "Unknown sources.") There is a similar side-load app from YTD.

With the WinX YouTube Channel Downloader, you’ll need to download their software before you do anything else. Now, this system does have a paid version, or you can check out the free trial first. You get to choose the URL that you want to download and it can auto-detect all of the information about that video, including the format and size and even the resolution. But you still get to make the final determination. From there, you just click the button to download, and you’ll be ready to go.
Remember that problem of using Chrome extensions from the Google Web Store? You're going to have an even bigger issue when you want to download from YouTube using an Android app from the Google Play store, where Google has an even tighter grip. (Nor can you actually download anything with your officially sanctioned YouTube apps. Unless you live in India.)
SpiderOak's beauty is that it's a combination cloud syncing and storage service as well as a backup client all in one. Unlike some of the other services though, you'll have to pay for the storage you use. You get 2GB for free just for signing up, and you can get up to 10GB by referring friends. SpiderOak Plus nets you 100GB for $10/mo to use for syncing and backups, and every 100GB after that is another $10/mo. Plus, you can connect as many computers to any SpiderOak account as you want, so you're not paying by the system. You can read more about SpiderOak's plans here.
You actually get the option to save your downloaded YouTube videos in different formats, which means they can be accessible in different ways and from different devices. There’s even the option to download to an MP3 file with most of these, which means that you can skip the video and be able to listen to the audio through your MP3 player or your phone. Each of these makes it easy for you to get the information without having to go through an internet connection in order to do it and easy to know how to download YouTube channel.
If you’re in a place where you don’t really have internet, but you don’t want to use up the data that’s still available on your mobile device you can still get access to the information that you want. Downloading and watching videos can eat away a lot of data from your phone plan or it could take up a whole lot of bandwidth that you really don’t want to be using. Instead, you could have the video already downloaded and ready to play without you having to continue using up the data.
SpiderOak's beauty is that it's a combination cloud syncing and storage service as well as a backup client all in one. Unlike some of the other services though, you'll have to pay for the storage you use. You get 2GB for free just for signing up, and you can get up to 10GB by referring friends. SpiderOak Plus nets you 100GB for $10/mo to use for syncing and backups, and every 100GB after that is another $10/mo. Plus, you can connect as many computers to any SpiderOak account as you want, so you're not paying by the system. You can read more about SpiderOak's plans here.
Third-party software is where you will get the best control over downloading online videos. Typically, you paste the URL for the YouTube video you want into the program, and it downloads the highest quality version it can find. For videos in 1080p High Definition (HD) format, that's usually an MP4 file. For anything higher in quality—4K and even 8K videos—the file format is typically MKV.
Jihosoft 4K Video Downloader is available as a completely free system that actually works for both PC and Mac users, but there’s a paid version as well. What’s really great about this YouTube video downloader is that it actually works for just about any kind of video you want to download, whether that video comes from Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, SoundCloud, or YouTube, so you’re not stuck with just one platform. You’re also going to have the option to download in just about any resolution and still get all the audio and subtitles that usually come with the video. On top of all that, you can convert to any video format or even MP3 audio, so you’re always able to watch (or listen).

Have something to say about one of the contenders? Want to make the case for your personal favorite, even if it wasn't included in the list? Remember, the top five are based on your most popular nominations from the call for contenders thread from earlier in the week. Don't just complain about the top five, let us know what your preferred alternative is—and make your case for it—in the discussions below.
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