Those looking for a free YouTube channel downloader that will allow them to get access to all of their favorite videos and channels directly on their own device will most definitely want to see these top options. Each of these five methods will provide you with a way to get the most out of the platform and also to make sure you never run out of things to watch. All you have to do is figure out which method works the best and just how it goes, which we’ll go over right here.

Have something to say about one of the contenders? Want to make the case for your personal favorite, even if it wasn't included in the list? Remember, the top five are based on your most popular nominations from the call for contenders thread from earlier in the week. Don't just complain about the top five, let us know what your preferred alternative is—and make your case for it—in the discussions below.
Bitcasa Infinite Drive is relatively new, but it's one of your favorite cloud storage providers in general, mostly because they offer virtually unlimited stroage for syncing and backups. When we say unlimited, we mean it—some of you are using terabytes of storage with Bitcasa. It's not primarily a backup service though, and while it was built for file syncing and storage, the Bitcasa desktop client does support regular file backups. Bitcasa supports Windows and OS X, and encrypts all of your files before uploading so they stay safe from prying eyes. Bitcasa even keeps revision history, so if you've backed up a file multiple times and need an older version, you can pick it out and restore it. Plus, you can use the Bitcasa mobile apps for iOS, Android, and Windows Phone to access your data on the go.
This program is straightforward to use because there are only a few simple steps to download YouTube videos and channels. The first is that you need to copy and paste the specific URL for the video or channel that you’re trying to download. From there, you get to select the specific video resolution that you want to use. Then, just download the video. It really is that simple to get the access you’re looking for. If you want to convert the videos that’s an option too, so you may want to check it out as a free option.
Carbonite is one of the web's most popular online backup services, and for good reason. The Carbonite client runs quietly in the background uploading your data to Carbonite's servers to make sure it's safe in case something happens to your computer. Carbonite can automatically back up documents, music, email, and other files (although it manually backs up video), and grants you access to those files and your archives on your smartphone. Carbonite supports Windows and OS X (although its Home Plus and Home Premier plans only support Windows), and make restoring your files as easy as backing them up. Your offsite files are encrypted to keep them safe from prying eyes, and all of their plans include unlimited storage for your backed up files. Carbonite's Home Plus plan extends its features and allows you to back up external hard drives and not just files on your computer, and allows you to back up full system images. The Home Premier plan includes both of those features and adds automatic backup of your video files, and a courier recovery service that delivers you backups on a hard drive to you ASAP if something terrible happens.
Do you prefer to avoid installing software? Video download helper sites do the download work for you, providing conversion and then a download link—you don't have to install anything on your PC. It can take a lot longer, depending on the size and quality of the video you want—a typical two-minute movie trailer in 1080p can be around 30MB—but you can't beat the convenience.
The Chrome Web Store—where you get Chrome browser extensions—is controlled by YouTube's owner Alphabet/Google. Even an extension ostensibly for this purpose—like the obviously named Video Downloader professional above—states right up front in its description, "The download of YouTube videos to hard drive is locked because of restrictions of the Chrome Store." In general with Chrome extensions, the download of any RTMP protocol video (protected videos) or streaming video isn't possible.

SpiderOak's beauty is that it's a combination cloud syncing and storage service as well as a backup client all in one. Unlike some of the other services though, you'll have to pay for the storage you use. You get 2GB for free just for signing up, and you can get up to 10GB by referring friends. SpiderOak Plus nets you 100GB for $10/mo to use for syncing and backups, and every 100GB after that is another $10/mo. Plus, you can connect as many computers to any SpiderOak account as you want, so you're not paying by the system. You can read more about SpiderOak's plans here.

Ben Moore is an Analyst for PCMag's software team covering video streaming services, security software, GNU/Linux, and the occasional PC game. He has previously written for Laptop Mag, Neowin.net, and Tom's Guide. Ben holds a degree in New Media and Digital Design from Fordham University at Lincoln Center, where he served as the Editor-in-Chief of The Observer, the student-run newspaper.
Digiarty's multi-lingual WinX claims to allow downloads from 300+ sites—including adult sites. Perhaps the biggest selling point of all is the claim that "There is no malware, adware, spyware or virus. 100% clean." The latest version has a much improved interface as well. There are ads, though—on install, I was asked to upgrade to its $29.90 product for Windows and macOS called VideoProc, which does everything that WinX does, but for 1,000+ sites, plus offers some editing for high-end 4K/UHD video.

With this online YouTube channel downloader, you have the ability to download the YouTube channel you want completely free, as long as it’s not copyrighted. This service provides downloads for what it considers ‘educational purposes.’ It does block any kind of content that has copyrighted material in it, which means you’re not going to have quite as many options for what you want to download, but you’re still going to have a lot of interesting things that you can listen to or watch. What’s really great is that it’s simple to use.


Another workaround: Go back to the desktop and try AnyTrans ($39.99 for a single computer), a file manager for iOS devices that has an integrated downloader supporting 900 sites, including YouTube and Facebook. It'll transfer the videos to the iPhone for you over the USB cable. Even if you don't pay for AnyTrans, the download option remains and is free forever.
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